NAHBS 2019: The Awards, Part I

NAHBS 2019: The Awards, Part I

The 2019 North American Handmade Bicycle Show is off to a roaring start with the most exhibitors ever in the history of the show. What follows are all the nominees and category award winners that the judges: Tom Kellogg, Nick Legan and I, were able to finish on Day 1. These are simply the nominees and winner for each category. I’ll go into the why in a subsequent post.

First up: Tandem. Our finalists were Rob English, above …

Paul Sadoff’s Rock Lobster and …

Built by Brad Bingham, with Bingham Taking the honors.

Our finalists for Best Cyclocross bike were Rock Lobster …

Enigma …

And McGovern, which won the category.

For Best Track bike our finalists the category were Weis …

Gaulzetti …

And T•Red took the top honor.

Best Finish was a challenge as always and we could have had half a dozen finalists. This FiftyOne made the cut …

As did this entry from No. 22 …

But the ioklin took the day.

Competition in the Best Mountain Bike Category was stiff. Olivetti was a finalist …

As was first-time exhibitor Seven Cycles …

The entry from Mosaic Cycles stopped discussion.

Best Gravel Bike had an incredible number of entrants and was very hard to judge. This bike from Crumpton Cycles was a finalist …

As was this bike from T Lab (not to be confused with T•Red) …

However, this Evergreen from Seven was a total show-stopper and won the category.

For Best Road Bike we had a tough time whittling down to three finalists, but this Steve Rex made the cut …

As did this lovely rig from No. 22 …

But this entry from Seven Cycles took the category. Again, I’ll be back to drill down on why in a coming post.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

8 comments

  1. MCH

    Thanks for the coverage and great pics. Is it just me, or are their a lot of new builders displaying bikes at this year’s show? It’s great to see that custom builders are thriving.

    Just a random thought, is purple anodizing back??


    1. Author
      Padraig

      There weren’t any more new builders than usual; they always occupy one row on one side of the show. There were a few builders outside of the new builder row that surprised me, but best of all was just how high the quality was of a number of the new builders exhibited. This was really the first time that judging the best new builder category was difficult.

      And yes, purple ano is back. Way back.

  2. Jeremy

    Reallly the most innovative design at the show was TReds nickel titanium seat stays on the Hedra. Real Vertical travel with damping and no gizmos. That is the biggest deal of the show. Highly promising tech.

  3. Lucas

    Wow these awards are quite disappointing considering the level of work on show at NAHBS. What about the Cherubim Air Line? Or the 1350g steel framed DeAnima which is the world’s lightest steel frame?! Those two builds alone are significantly more impressive than the bikes listed here.


    1. Author
      Padraig

      If they don’t enter the bike for consideration, it is hard to acknowledge. Gotta play to win. And because we look at more than 100 bikes for the various categories, we don’t have the ability to walk the floor asking what is cool about each and every bike. I want to do all I can to shine a light on great work, but we need them to speak up.

  4. Nick DeAnda

    My friend was at NAHBS 2019 and told me he asked an exhibitor with two finalist ribbons hanging from one of his bikes about how he could have two when the rules clearly stated that a bike can be entered for judging in only ONE category?
    This exhibitor told him that he did not actually enter either judging category and in fact, has never entered any of them over the years, despite his bikes winning various trophies at NAHBS.
    While you’re at it, can you explain how you can ethically judge the work of an exhibitor who advertises on RKP and pays you $500 for each bike ordered through your site? Just wondering.

    I would do this myself if it were possible to do it anonymously, but since my friends were exhibitors there I don’t want the guy to think they put me up to this as it’s solely my opinion. And since we’re bitter enemies he’d never allow a post from me to appear on his site.


    1. Author
      Padraig

      There are old rules that existed prior to me becoming head judge that I abolished, such as that one that says that a bike can only be entered in one category, as well as the one that said a builder could only enter two categories total. I’ve stricken them; they are dumb rules, and yet as people work on the web site, they get reproduced regularly; it drives me nuts. The rules are meant to recognize great work, not create a barrier to recognizing great work. I can say for certain that this year we didn’t pull a single bike for more than one category; to my knowledge there was only one bike we requested for one category. Also, to say a bike wasn’t entered isn’t quite right; we will on occasion request a bike; at that point it is considered entered. We don’t just wander around handing out ribbons to unsuspecting builders. Nick, you seem to have a pretty negative outlook on the awards in general, and Mark on a more personal level, so my only response to your characterization of the relationship I have with Mark DiNucci is that it isn’t remotely accurate. It’s easier to have a reasonable conversation if you don’t have someone just making up stuff. This borders on InfoWars conspiracy stuff. I’m going to suggest that your opinion of Mr. DiNucci may be coloring your opinion of the awards, which is a shame because while the awards may not mean much to some folks, his work is worthy of respect.

  5. Nick DeAnda

    My friend was at NAHBS 2019 and told me he asked an exhibitor with two finalist ribbons hanging from one of his bikes about how he could have two when the rules clearly stated that a bike can be entered for judging in only ONE category?
    This exhibitor told him that he did not actually enter either judging category and in fact, has never entered any of them over the years, despite his bikes winning various trophies at NAHBS.
    While you’re at it, can you explain how you can ethically judge the work of an exhibitor who advertises on RKP and pays you $500 for each bike ordered through your site?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *