Paceline Podcast #63

Paceline Podcast #63

Fatty is back and he has an update on his Jonathan Vaughters intervention training. It’s a basement-trainer session beyond belief.

We take a look at an interesting study on why and where cyclists break traffic laws. The researchers found that survival instinct is a major player but so are social norms.

In the second of his two-part interview, Patrick talked to Jim Cummins and Lelan Dains from Dirty Kanza about what can prevent a rider from finishing and just how remote some parts of the course are.

Another hard race, Paris-Roubaix, showed us why being the strongest rider doesn’t always cut it and how a little bar tape on your pedals can provide some cobblestone relief.

This podcast is supported by Health IQ, a life insurance company that celebrates cyclists and other health conscious people.  Visit healthiq.com/paceline to learn more & get a free quote, or check out their life insurance FAQ page to get your questions answered.

The Paceline is also supported by Eliel Cycling. Crafted in California, the Eliel brand combines the latest technology with cycling tradition to deliver an experience that is authentically California. View their retail gear and custom program at www.elielcycling.com

 

 

Show links:

Scofflaw Bicycling: Illegal but Rational

Dirty Kanza

The Dirty Kanza Rider’s Bible

Strava Paris-Roubaix

S-Town Podcast

 


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5 comments

  1. Quentin

    When you read the list of Sagan’s anonymous teammates, I also haven’t heard of most of them, but I think one or two of them deserve a little more credit. Burghardt was on BMC’s classics teams for many years and seems to be a well-regarded domestique in those races. The other notable one to me is Bodnar. He’s the guy who instigated the 4-man breakaway in the tailwinds with Sagan, Froome and Thomas in the Tour last summer. With that kind of strength and heads-up riding, he would probably be a sure thing for any team’s classics squad (except maybe Quick Step). Of course, that still leaves Sagan several established classics riders short of the sort of team he needs.


    1. Author
      Michael Hotten

      Quentin- thanks for listening. We did give Burghardt a shout out for his quick times over the cobbles. But in the end, Sagan was left to fight for himself.

  2. Dizzy

    OMG! That “Scofflaw” study is awesome. That’s going to every politician; local, state and federal, that rules my turf!

    Thanx for the reference! Dizzy

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