The Paceline Podcast #51

The Paceline Podcast #51

Fatty needs a detective. He is having a problem with theft. Someone is taking bike clothes from the Fatty household. It’s a Lycra whodunnit and it maybe an inside job.

Michael is back on the show for a segment about fat. And of course this segment will center around Fatty’s weight loss challenge. The discussion will also lead to an interview with Justin Gold, founder of Justin’s nut butters. After making into Starbucks, Justin is finding that his packets of almond butter are making there way into the pockets of cyclists.

As kids, many of us would spend our days chugging soda and riding bikes. And what’s wrong with that? A group that puts on High School mountain bike races says the problem is caffeine. Padraig interviews Austin McInerny of NICA about his reminder to parents and competitors that slamming a soda before heading to the start line could be a problem.

The new Pinarello Dogma F10, a shakeup in the bike media industry and Interbike is keeping its September date in Las Vegas but a move of both date and place are still being discussed.

The Paceline is supported by: Health IQ. The people at Health IQ believe in cyclists and believe that healthy people should be rewarded with lower life insurance rates. Check them out here.

 

 

Show Links:

Justin’s

NICA

NICA rule book. Caffeine clause on page 10

Pinarello Dogma F10

 


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7 comments

  1. Sean

    While I really enjoy these podcasts, I’m afraid I have to call you out over your comments on Las Vegas at the end of this one. It’s not just you. Almost every cycling podcast I listen to eventually has the presenter decrying the fact that Interbike is held in “such an unhealthy city”. You whine about the smoking and the gambling and the drinking and the cheap food- IT’S THE STRIP! It exists so tourists can come to town, debase themselves and leave lots of pretty dollars behind. That is not the Las Vegas people live in. If you’d get your butts out of the hotel and off the strip you might discover a little secret-this is a big outdoor town.
    There are thousands of cyclists here. Both road and mountain. There are miles upon miles of great road cycling as easy or challenging as you wish. River Mountain Loop- 36 miles of paved dedicated cycling/walking trail that runs along Lake Mead and climbs up to Bootleg Canyon (that happens to house a mountain bike park with lifts for the downhill runs-fancy that) and back down to the outskirts of Henderson, connecting to another 20+ miles of standalone paved trails. Blue Diamond has a bike outpost for mountain bikers and roadies to stop and refresh/refuel/repair before heading out again. The Red Rock Scenic Loop-13 miles of one way road through some amazing geography with a cat 2 climb and a spectacular descent. On any nice weekend- and by the way, we have those pretty much year-round- you’ll see an endless parade of cyclists in both directions on the Blue Diamond loop and on the River Mountain trail. You can ride up Mount Potosi right from town. Drive up to Mount Charleston and blow your lungs out riding from the hotel to Lee Canyon and back. Not to mention 100+ miles of mountain biking, triathlon clubs, running clubs and every other outdoor activity you can think of.
    So maybe next time you’re here, rent a bike -there are services that’ll bring nicely appointed ones right to your room- and come join one of the many group rides on tap and let the locals show you how great the cycling is in Las Vegas.

    1. Lyford

      And for a different kind of tourist nightlife, there are guided desert walks that include the use of blacklights, which make scorpions and other critters visibly flouresce in the darkness. Very cool.

    2. Padraig

      Sean, my apologies for offending you about your home. If I may, I think it’s fair to observe that there are at least two Las Vegases, the one that you live in and the one the tourists see. It’s true that I’ve done a couple of nice rides while in Vegas; and I’m sure there’s much to recommend for those who live there; also, good riding is definitely possible. However, for professional reasons, my time in Vegas is spent near the strip. Generally speaking, we all come in from out of town and so walking to dinner whenever possible is helpful. We end up spending our time pretty close to Mandalay Bay. The points you bring up would all belong in any proper travel feature; however, that’s not why we are there and my days are so long (I typically get five hours of sleep per night during the show), I only ride on Monday and Tuesday, the days of the Outdoor Expo. I’m too tired and too pressed for time to go chasing anything I would call fun. Doing a hard group ride before a day spent on the show floor would be professional suicide. I have to get there ready for a long day.

      Is it fair to Las Vegas? Perhaps not. But this is the reality of visiting Vegas for Interbike.

    1. Padraig

      Thanks for chiming in on that. We’ve missed some links here and there on the Paceline Picks, but generally, you should be able find links for each of the Paceline Picks in our show notes just above the comment section.

  2. Prentiss Berry

    My father got me into cycling . He gave me his old jerseys when they stopped fitting him . We have actually shared quite a bit when it comes to cycling . Normally I am the band it who has rode off with the a pair of gloves, jersey , socks, you get the idea . Well I had a Campagnolo compact crank sitting in our workshop form a bike I used to ride. It conveniently went missing. This also might have happened around the time where he moved to the mountains . Where he “need mountain gears”. Need less to say I am a firm believer he drove across the country . Which of course is fine . It is bringing joy to the O G riding partner/sensei and I am stoked about that. Now when he asks if I am wearing his wind vest in that picture . I mean who knows dad it could be right ? My self and my father have and I think will always feel your pain .

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