Winter PressCamp 2016, Part III

Winter PressCamp 2016, Part III

Ridley has been known as a niche player, an upper-end Euro brand that doesn’t do entry level. The upshot is that you have been more likely to see them under a pro on TV rather than in a Cat. IV criterium. Founded by an uncompromising frame builder, I think they were okay with that.

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Until now.

At PressCamp Ridley unveiled two new models. Well, that might be stretching things. They introduced two new versions of existing bikes—the Dean and the Noah. What’s different about these is that they are new price-point versions of two of their most popular bikes.

The Noah trades its F-Split fork for a more traditional (and easier to manufacture) fork and eliminates all the 60-ton carbon fiber in favor of a layup of all 30-ton carbon. The upshot is that the bike weighs the same as its more expensive brother—while the frame gains weight, the simpler design of the fork loses weight for a zero sum. Similarly, the TT/Tri Dean also gives up the F-Split fork for a simpler design. 

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The changes to the bikes allow Ridley to bring in these rides under $4000, depending on the parts pick.

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Last year Abus showed some some new bike helmets. While the German manufacturer is better known for its locks, they’ve taken protection as their larger mission, hence helmets. The model shown above, the Pedelec, is a commuter-oriented helmet with a visor built in and bee-catching mesh in the front of the helmet. The unit on the right has the built-in rain cover deployed. It also has an integrated blinking light in the back for increased visibility. The dots on the sides of the rain cover are reflective as well.

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One thing that caught my eye in our visit with Giordana was the single least substantial wind jacket I’ve ever encountered. I’m told it weighs an insignificant 60 grams—that’s the equivalent of six paperclips. The shot above is pretty close to life size. You can shove it in a jersey pocket and still have room for food. The stuff sack is integrated into the tail of the jacket and takes seconds to stow.

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